Tag Archive for nook

Lie with the Dead now available for Kindle, Nook

The Pack Book 2: Lie with the Dead is now available in e-book formats, as well as in trade paperback at Barnes & Noble!

Get it how you want it!

Get it your way today!

Amazon Kindle Link

Barnes & Noble TPB/Nook Link

Whichever your pleasure, Evileye Books is ready for you. Lie with the Dead is now eligible for the Kindle Matchbook program, so if you purchase (or already purchased) the trade paperback, you can download the Kindle edition at no additional charge.

Winter Kill is also available in trade paperback at Barnes & Noble once more, now with the new cover.

Looking for additional formats or markets? Please let me know and I’ll see if I can’t make it happen.

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

The Deadliest Ad

The remastered and relaunched version of my debut novel, Deadliest of the Species, has been out a few weeks now. Response has been good, but things have been quiet on the review front.

My publisher worked up a new ad, and it should be making the rounds soon:

She's back, and she's waiting for you

She’s back, and she’s waiting for you

Check it out on Kindle, Nook, or Smashwords (with more to come, including trade paperback). I’ve been waiting a long time for this, and I hope the rest of you find it worth the wait, too.

Already have Deadliest? Great! Thank you very much. If you enjoyed it, be sure to read the extended preview for Winter Kill at the end, or peruse my other work in the side column on my home page. Some of it is even free!

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

DotS: Remastered and Relaunched

She’s back!

After ten years out of print, Deadliest of the Species, my Bram Stoker Award-winning first novel, is now available from Evileye Books.

Deadliest Book Stack

Now available on Nook and Kindle!

 

She’s been through a lot in the interim, but she’s now in good hands with my editors at Evileye, the same guys who helped bring you Winter Kill. Judging by the email and convention conversations I’ve had over the years, this release is going to make a lot of people happy.

This new, electronic edition of Deadliest of the Species is only $2.99. It’s already live for the Nook and Kindle. Other electronic formats will follow shortly, including iBooks, and we’ll have a trade paperback edition soon after that.

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

“Bravo Four” Now Available on Nook

Nook readers, I’ve got some news for you: the first short story in The Pack series, “Bravo Four”, is now available in the Nook store!

Bravo Four short story cover

Come get some, Nook fans!

Werewolves in Vietnam. What’s not to love? New readers to the series will be able to jump right in, and fans will get a glimpse into the history behind the series.

As with the Kindle edition, the package includes an extended preview of the first Pack novel, Winter Kill.

All for only 99 cents.

Download and enjoy, my friends.

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

Back at Last: Deadliest of the Species Remastered Next Month

There is one question I get from readers more than any other: “Where can I get a copy of Deadliest of the Species?”

The answer alternated between “eBay” and “you can’t,” depending upon my mood. Though it won a Bram Stoker Award, Deadliest of the Species has been out of print for ten years.

Next month, that changes.

Deadliest Book Stack

Deadliest of the Species, remastered

I’m happy to announce Evileye Books will republish Deadliest of the Species in an all new, remastered edition. It will drop for Kindle and Nook readers this March, followed by a trade paperback edition in April.

From the press release:

In “Deadliest of the Species,” Mr. Oliveri lays down the roots of his writing craft and stakes out his place in the horror tradition as a masterful writer of plot, suspense and thrill sequences. Anyone who has read his work will tell you they couldn’t put the stories down. The same is true of “Deadliest of Species,” where it all started.

This has been a long time coming, folks. I hope you dig it.

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

Set Me On Fire, Amazon

I’m sold.

On buying one for my wife, that is.

I think the Kindle Fire will not be an iPad killer in the sense people will ignore the iPad, but in the sense it will sell huge to people who would otherwise not purchase an iPad or who were put off by its $500+ price point as a media consumption device. This isn’t going to bury the iPad, it’s going to bury the Nook.

Go ahead and balk, B&N fans, but let’s think about this: Amazon has a much broader range of content when you consider streaming video, and for someone who already has a Prime membership or has been considering one, it’s the dealmaker. $200 to have access to all my Amazon books, music and movies, as well as streaming, their App Store, and other offerings?

Yes, please.

Back to my wife. She has a 2nd-gen Kindle and a 1st- or 2nd-gen iPod touch. The Kindle Fire will replace both, for the way she uses them. She will have all of her books available, and now she will be able to access her email and Facebook on the same device rather than switch to her iPod touch. Her music will probably fit on the Kindle Fire as well, and it’s not often she listens to music anyway.

If this demo is any indication, it’s going to have the same ease of use as her Kindle and iPod, too:

There seem to be a few stutters in button presses, but I’m wondering if that’s a limitation of the hardware or if it’s their Wi-Fi getting hammered by reporters. It could also be bugs to be worked out before the tablet actually sees release on November 15th. Wired seems to be wondering the same thing. Time will tell, but given Amazon’s track record, I imagine they’ll get it right. If it turns out it’s not quite as speedy as the iPad, then keep in mind, it’s 300 dollars cheaper.

I think their burying Android in the background is a good thing, too. Sure, a geek like me will want access to all the Android features, but the general population just doesn’t care. My wife (and kids!) took to the iPod with no problems. Her Samsung Android phone, however, has a confusing array of settings and menus, and even something as simple as deleting an email message was not immediately apparent. Amazon is keeping it simple because all of the technophobes and elderly users who embraced the early Kindle (and Nook) may just make the leap to a color display so they can keep up with their friends and family on the web.

Selling to geeks is good. Selling to everyone is better.

Kindle Comics

Comics!

Speaking of geeks, now the color screen gives Amazon the ability to bring in a whole new market. Amazon is in a far better position to woo the big comics publishers than the many startups building iPad apps. The publishers are already selling the books through Amazon, they just need to add the digital deals. In fact, they may already have. Think that’s just a digital mockup of Watchmen as a convenient example? Nope. Watchmen is already available on the Kindle Store.

Then scroll a little below the book information, and you have this (click for full text):

Kindle Fire Comic Books closeup

Kindle Fire: Comic Books

This says they already have a comics viewer called Kindle Panel View. Now I guess it’s just a matter of time before we see what announcements the comics publishers may have.

For my own use, I’m not quite sold. I need something I can work on, something I can use to write. Access to my notes and being able to brainstorm via Evernote is one thing, but typing long-form on a 7″ screen is going to be a headache. There’s no Bluetooth in the Kindle Fire, so a wireless keyboard is out, and most reports are there’s no way to connect a wired keyboard. Japanese authors may be ready to thumb-type their novels, but that’s not a leap I’m prepared to take. The Kindle Fire probably isn’t going to fit the bill.

A second-generation Kindle Fire, however, may be another story…

Someone asked me whether I’m an Apple fan or an Amazon fan. I’ll put it this way: I have a lot of Apple hardware, but I’m all up in Amazon’s digital services on all those devices, as well as my Android phone. I’m sure I’ll be running on Apple desktops and laptops for the foreseeable future, but if Amazon puts out a future tablet I can write on and do a few of the other things I do with my iPad, then I will press that buy button with all speed.

Well done, Amazon.

Kane Clapping

 

 

UPDATE: Toldja they were doing comics. DC has announced a deal with Amazon to put digital graphic novels exclusively on the Kindle. And thus another line has been drawn in the battle between the Kindle and Nook.

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

TP:WK Now on the Nook!

Been toting a Nook around instead of a Kindle? Prefer shopping at Barnes & Noble over Amazon? Then at last you can get an electronic copy of The Pack: Winter Kill on your favorite device! It’s available today with an introductory price of just $2.99.

TPWK Limited Edition Cover

The new electronic edition cover.

Not to be outdone, the Kindle edition has gone to $2.99 as well. Again, both prices are for a limited time only. Get it while it’s hot!

Purchase for the Nook
Purchase for the Kindle

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

No Nookie for You

I went into a Barnes & Noble this evening and spotted stacks of Nook eReader pamphlets at the information desk and near the registers. I picked one up and an employee was all too eager to tell me more about it. There’s just one problem: the Nook is already sold out through the end of the year.

Not too bad for a product that, by some accounts, should be dead before it even launched.

I should probably qualify that statement. The people I run into who claim the e-book “fad” won’t last are all bibliophiles. They don’t just read books, they collect them. I will readily admit that I’m as much a collector — or at least an accumulator — of bits of dead trees stamped with ink and glued/sewn together myself, so I don’t fault them for it. However, it doesn’t take a big brain to figure out e-books are here to stay.

Amazon and Barnes & Noble are playing their cards close to the vest, so it’s tough to say how many units they’ve actually sold. However, with every major publisher and many smaller presses on the bandwagon, it’s tough to believe they aren’t doing well. Keep in mind, the Nook not only sold out before the holidays, but it sold out in pre-order. They have yet to get a physical unit into anyone’s hands, including reviewers’, and they’ve still sold every unit scheduled to ship out of the factory. That’s the kind of scenario every business dreams of.

The bibliophiles may dismiss electronic books, and the e-readers may have their shortcomings for the moment, but it amazes me the variety of demographic I’ve seen for these things. Technophiles are among the first in line, of course, but I’ve also seen some other writers and book lovers toting them around. I know of schools buying units for classrooms, including elementary grades. There are colleges putting them in the hands of incoming students. At work, we’ve got a retired teacher who can’t say enough about her Kindle, and she can barely negotiate her way around the Windows desktop. She subbed in our junior high building one day and had all of the other teachers drooling over her shiny white e-reader in its little leather folder. My wife and my mom both tear through novels and could care less what happens to the actual books after they read them. They’re both waiting to see if and how Amazon responds to the Nook’s color LCD, and they’ll both most likely own one or the other sometime next year.

E-books are a win-win for voracious readers. They can carry most of their library with them, and they get instant gratification when searching for a title. If they get 100 pages into a book and decide it’s garbage, with just a couple of clicks they’re reading a different book, even if they’re sitting in the park or riding on a bus or train. I hear the bibliophiles complain about battery life issues, but I have yet to hear a Kindle owner offer up any real complaints about it beyond “Eh, I’ll plug it in when I get home.”

From a writer’s perspective, why ignore them? I’ve talked to a couple of guys now who could care less if their books are on the Kindle because they think e-books won’t last (see bibliophiles above). Okay, let’s say Amazon sold 50,000 units. I have no idea how close or far from reality that is, but it’s a nice, round number. That’s 50,000 people who are going to visit a dedicated store that will be stocking your book. You don’t have to sweat which chains are in their neighborhood and whether or not their local store is stocking your book. You don’t have to worry about whether or not they shop at a local indie store that may or may not have ever heard of your or have shelf space for your book.

Yes, you still have to make these 50,000 people aware of your book, but isn’t that better than having to make them aware of the book and having to make an effort to get it stocked? What makes the book more likely for them to stumble upon: Amazon’s Recommended, Also Bought, and Also Browsed links and thumbnails, or your book sitting spine-out among a sea of other spine-out books? Even if only 1% of those 50,000 people read the kind of material you produce, you’ve just made your book easier to find with zero effort.

Sure, it’s still supplemental at this point, and I realize the overwhelming majority of readers are still purchasing dead trees. The Barnes & Noble was packed tonight, and obviously they weren’t buying Nooks and e-books. That’s why The Pack: Winter Kill will have both a Kindle Edition and the imminent trade paperback edition. It’s not smart to ignore the e-book market, but it’s suicidal to ignore the dead tree markets.

Will that hold true in five years, though? Or ten? When they get the technology behind a vibrant color display with the same battery life as the existing grayscale displays and the costs start coming down, I imagine a lot of trees will be breathing a deep sigh of relief.

Hmm… I wonder if the Sierra Club has made that connection yet?

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.