Tag Archive for werewolves

The Pack Book 2: Lie with the Dead Available Now

And we have liftoff! The Pack Book 2: Lie with the Dead is now available in trade paperback.

Evileye Books is launching the title with a 10% discount on Amazon. Stay tuned for e-book information.

Lie with the Dead picks up six months after the events in Winter Kill, and we learn the Tylers aren’t the only ones who have secrets to keep.

Today my contributor copies arrived, too. Man it’s nice to have this one out there at last.

Better than Christmas!

Hope you dig, folks.

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

New Winter Kill Now Available

The new edition of Winter Kill is now available in trade paperback on Amazon. If you’re into crime and/or horror, I think you’ll dig it.

New cover! Oooh, ahhhh.

New cover! Oooh, ahhhh.

This edition of the book has a new format, a new cover, and an excerpt from the sequel, Lie with the Dead, which is due out in early March. In fact, I’m told my contributor copies will be landing at my doorstep any day now.

If you’re new to my work or my The Pack series, Winter Kill is the first book and this is the ideal jumping-on point. If you’re a digital reader, stay tuned next week for more information on this new Kindle edition of Winter Kill.

New readers can also get a taste of the series by reading the first The Pack short story, “Bravo Four”, for only 99 cents on Amazon, or by checking out the short comic “Big Bad Wolves” on Indie Pulp. “Bravo Four” takes place several decades prior to Winter Kill and is set during the Vietnam War. “Big Bad Wolves”, meanwhile, leads into the events of Winter Kill.

And on that note, expect news on the next The Pack short story in the coming weeks.

The only downside to the new edition is we have a new ISBN, and thus a new product page on Amazon. As a result, our reviews aren’t listed on the new page. If you’ve read and enjoyed Winter Kill, I’d greatly appreciate it if you posted a review on the new product page.

Here’s a taste of previous reviews:

These people have taste.

These people have taste.

Respect.

Respect.

In the end, it’s the same great book, it just has a new face and some bonus material. I hope you’ll check it out.

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

Lie with the Dead is GO!

After some unforeseen delays, Evileye Books and I have a release timeline for the next novel in the The Pack series, Lie with the Dead. From the official press release:

Lie with the Dead 3D cover

Lie with the Dead

“Lie with the Dead,” the second installment in Mike Oliveri’s werewolf noir series, “The Pack,” will be released in March, following the release of a revised edition of book one, “Winter Kill” in February.
“Lie with the Dead” continues FBI special agent Angela Wallace’s search for answers about the mysterious Tyler clan and the bloody aftermath of the shootout with gun runners that left her recovering in a hospital. In book two, the trail leads her to a deserted mining town in Nevada where, once again, she finds herself fighting for her life against unseen enemies hellbent on keeping secrets buried.
“Lie with the Dead” will be released in trade paperback and digital editions.

This has been a long time coming. I’m excited, folks!

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

That Was Then

I saw this old pic in my Flickr stream and it made me think about time wasted.

My Gadget Bag

I carried all that crap to work

I took this for some tech blog or other which had asked “What’s in your gadget bag?” At the time I worked as the sysadmin for a small, family-owned dial-up ISP and had throw myself into IT. Writing wasn’t paying off, I had young children to feed, and I kept worrying I was wasting my time chasing a pipe dream.

This was about the time I had twelve different short stories and novellas lined up for publication, yet only three of them came to fruition. Not a one of those three paid a penny. This was a year after an editor told me he wanted my book for his mass market line and I never heard from him again. Yep, it’s a tough biz, and I flat out couldn’t afford to treat it as anything more than a hobby.

I know better now.

I was good at IT. Hell, I still am. I thought throwing myself into servers and networks would be a much better career plan. I worked at the ISP, I worked on a few computers on the side, and I even wrote a few technical articles and had them published. I read a lot to expand my skills and build up my resumé, and I did the social networking thing to make contacts in the industry.

Pretty soon I realized it was no easier in IT. Techs are a dime a dozen, employers don’t want to talk to a guy without a degree, and tech recruiters don’t know the first thing about the technology they’re recruiting for. I wrote technical articles because I was confident I could get them published, but they didn’t pay any better than the horror markets I was used to. If I wanted to make money writing tech, I would have to build my career the same as I would my horror career.

Only problem is writing those tech articles bored the shit out of me.The studying and reading also bored the shit out of me, and I hated the work. The dial-up ISP got gutted by the arrival of DSL, and tech support is a maddening, soul-sucking exercise in futility. Writing and developing software felt like an option to flex creative muscles, but in reality it too just bored me to tears.

Now which was the waste of time? I wasn’t afraid of hard work, I just misread the odds of payoff and the satisfaction I get out of one vs the other.

I wrote fiction because I loved it. I still write fiction because I love it, despite letting other facets of reality slow things down for much of 2011. I put togetherand had published—Werewolves: Call of the Wild shortly after that revelation. Now Winter Kill is doing well for itself, Lie with the Dead is in development, and the first of two short comics has been released. I had a few other projects published in the meantime, including some of the projects I assumed were dead.

Yeah, I’m still in IT, but doing it for education gives me more time to do what I love on the side. Now I have a much clearer idea of what needs to be done to go to writing full time.

And I also get to travel a lot lighter.

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

Wolf Lake

The Chiller channel is running werewolf shows and flicks every night this week, and tonight they’re showing episodes of the Wolf Lake television series. It ran for one season in 2002, though it feels like it’s been a lot longer than that.

To be honest, I hardly remember the show. I don’t think I kept up with it when it aired, and to watch it now, I’m seeing melodrama, cheesy effects, and half-assed makeup.

Oh, and two transformations in two episodes I just watched, neither of which we got to see.

No wonder the show didn’t last. It makes me wonder, why is it so hard to get werewolves right in film and television? There’s a lot of love out there for the werewolf. They may not have the same popularity as vampires and zombies right now, but they’re a good monster and should be able to carry their own weight.

Unfortunately for every good flick like Dog Soldiers we get a stinker like Skinwalkers. An American Werewolf in London is a classic, but its memory is tarnished by the An American Werewolf in Paris follow-up and it’s horrible CGI werewolves. Fans get excited after seeing werewolves paired with vampires in the Underworld and Twilight flicks and Van Helsing, but then the Wolfman remake tanks and ruins all hope.

Several readers of The Pack: Winter Kill tell me they saw it as a movie while they read it, and I do hope someone in Hollywood will agree. But the question is, would it make it to the screen unscathed? There are several werewolf books out there, both stand-alone and series work, that are at least as suited for adaptation, but they’ll be overlooked because they don’t have vampires or whiny teenagers in them.

I don’t know. I can’t tell whether they’re trying too hard or they’re not trying hard enough. Whether they’re making changes for the sake of change or assuming a glimpse of an actor in a furry costume and a splash of CGI blood is all fans will care about.

Whatever the problem, Wolf Lake really had a shot at starting a werewolf craze. Big screen love helps, but it’s still hard to compete with the exposure of showing up on millions of televisions every week. When you’re on a major network to boot (CBS in chis case), it becomes a big ball to drop.

Here’s hoping the next attempt plays out a little better.

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

It'll Put Hair On Your Chest

The big talk of the werewolf fan communities is whether or not there will be a surge of popularity in werewolf media following the release of The Wolfman. I saw the flick Friday night, and you know, it’s really hard to say.

The movie itself is good. It’s feel is very faithful to the original, and there’s a great gothic horror flavor to it, yet enough action and violence to satisfy modern horror fans. The plot seems a bit rushed at points, but overall, I enjoyed it. It’s tough to say, though, that it’s going to excite anyone but existing werewolf fans. There’s nothing there for broader appeal: no love story, no catchy music, no hot young actors or actresses for folks to latch on to. (Emily Blunt is no certainly no slouch, but she spends all but a few frames in a stuffy Victorian dress.) It also doesn’t help that reviews seem to go either way, with critics either loving or hating it.

It’s too bad, as I’d love to capitalize on a werewolf craze. With it’s crime/thriller edge, my book The Pack: Winter Kill has a very different feel from The Wolfman (as well as just about any other werewolf flick), but I think that can help it appeal to a broader audience than just the werewolf fans. After all, let’s be honest: werewolf fans are my bread & butter and I love ’em, but it’s going to take a lot more than that to make the book a hit.

How about turning readers into werewolves? That do anything for ya?

The Pack: Winter Kill -- It'll put hair on your chest!

The Pack: Winter Kill -- It'll put hair on your chest!

Evileye wanted to institute a recall, but I talked them out of it. I have no money to give you if you sue me, so I say get out there and tear shit up! Fight the power! Stick it to The Man! Arrrooooo!!

Meanwhile, the folks over at Comics Bulletin have interviewed the man behind Evileye Books, Mr Aaron Ommus. Shoot on over and check out his thoughts on the comics market, digital comics, Evileye’s new releases, and the upcoming Evileye Reader for webcomics. I truly believe Ommus and Evileye are going to surprise a lot of people this year, whether or not my little wedge of dead paper (or collection of bits) does anything for them.

That wedge of dead paper has been jumping up and down in the Amazon sales ranks the last few days. I haven’t decoded how the sales rank works, but I’m guessing the jumps mean at least a few more people have picked up copies. If that includes any of you reading this, thanks! I hope you dug it.

If you want to pick up the book but aren’t a fan of Amazon, we’ll have you covered soon. We’re working on getting the book into the main distribution channels so it can be ordered through Borders, Barnes & Noble, and hopefully your favorite indie shop as well. Or, if you do have a favorite indie shop, have them contact Evileye Books directly. Ommus and his team will be happy to help any independents get copies.

Now I best get back to work on Book 2.

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

Year of the Wolf

Vampires and zombies have had their due. Welcome to the Year of the Wolf.

A little movie called The Wolfman is part of that feeling, and it doesn’t hurt that some of you watched a werewolf square off against some sparkling vampires in another little movie called New Moon, but this will be the year I feel like I can really contribute something to my favorite monster.

For starters, I’m taking The Pack: Winter Kill on the road starting this month. We’ve had our first contest, and reviewers will be receiving copies of the book soon.

Next up, you’ll start seeing Chimaera, the first The Pack comic from Evileye Books. The script is turned in, we’ll have an artist soon, and then we’ll get rolling on production. It’s a little early to discuss the firm plans, but I’ll just say you will likely see content sooner than you think.

Later this year we’ll be releasing the second The Pack prose book, which I’m working on but do not yet have a title for. I can tell you, though, that if you enjoy Winter Kill, you’re going to dig the next book. It’s going to have the same mix of crime thriller and supernatural horror.

Once I’m done writing the second prose book, I’ll get right to work on the second graphic novel. It may not see print before the end of the year (unfortunately the comics production side takes a lot longer than the prose side), but I should be able to bring you some teasers and production work to drool on.

And if all goes well, we’ll have a few other surprises for you, too! As always, stay tuned to this blog for more information.

These are exciting times, my friends, and it’s going to be a big year. Thanks to everyone who’s supported the book already, and thanks in advance to those of you who will be discovering the book and the series soon.

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

Werewolves on Film

It’s tough to make werewolves look good on screen. It’s hard to find two movies who take the same approach, and their appearance can range from cute & cuddly to mean & scary. Personally, I much prefer the make-up effects over CGI, especially when the latter makes them look like cartoons or teddy bears.

There’s a tangible quality to the makeup effects that CGI just can’t capture. It’s not always done well (I think the Underworld werewolves always look a bit ugly, almost unfinished), but even then they come across as scarier. Especially when they include blood effects, which always seems to be lacking in the CGI versions.

I poked around on YouTube a bit this evening, and I found this compilation video that has several examples:

I recognize most of them, but there are several unaccounted for.

I’m also a fan of the slower transformation scenes versus the instant wolf-out we see in movies like Van Helsing. The transformation scenes are a big part of the genre, and there’s just something visceral about them compared to the changes occurring in the blink of an eye. Sure, a werewolf can’t exactly break off from a fight to get his wolf on, and on the other side of the coin we get artificial suspense when there’s another character standing there and screaming in disbelief as they watch a werewolf slowly change shape, but it comes with the territory.

I’m not all that excited about the next Twilight flick, but I’m glad to see the werewolves are making the commercials (even if they are CGI). The new The Wolfman trailer, on the other hand, looks fantastic. Between the two, we get both styles of transformation (instant and progressive), and we get two styles of werewolf (straight wolf and what appears to be an upgrade to the hairy guy with teeth). I hope both of the movies do well, because I dig werewolves and I’d like to see them become the next big thing, trumping vampires and zombies as the monster of the moment.

Sure, I’m pimping a werewolf series, but at the same time, I think werewolves are due. There’s plenty of room for all the werewolves out there.

Now that I’m in the mood, I think I’m going to go crack open the new John Farris book, High Bloods. The simple cover design caught my eye on Borders, and it’s been a long time since I’ve read a werewolf book. I just wish he didn’t call them Lycans…

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.

It Is What It Is

Think Snakes on a Plane was clever for delivering exactly what the title promised? Ladies and gentlemen, I give you Werewolf in a Women’s Prison (NSFW):

Oh. Hell. Yes.

All it needs is Cullen Bunn’s roller derby team and we’ve got an instant cult classic on our hands.

By the way, yes, it’s a real movie, and it was released in Japan (surprise!). Sure, it’s cheesy, loaded with bad acting, rips off borrows from An American Werewolf in London, it has copious amounts of gore (and I’m guessing at least as much nudity), the werewolf has ridiculous LED eyes, and the stand-in stunt mannequins are as obvious as a kick in the nuts. I’ve watched the trailer a couple times now, and so help me, I can’t stop laughing at the person getting ripped in half as they’re dragged through the prison bars.

At least there’s no CGI.

About Mike Oliveri

Mike Oliveri is a writer, martial artist, cigar aficionado, motorcyclist, and family man, but not necessarily in that order. He is currently hard at work on the werewolf noir series The Pack for Evileye Books.